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Calorie Calculator

A calorie calculator helps you estimate the number of calories you need to consume daily to reach your weight loss goals. By inputting details such as your age, gender, weight, height, and activity level, the calculator provides a personalized calorie target. By maintaining a calorie deficit, where you consume fewer calories than your body needs, you can lose weight effectively.
Age:
Gender:
Male
Female
Height:
Weight:
Activity:
The number of calories your body
burns at rest to maintain
basic functions:
The number of calories you need to
consume per day to maintain
your current weight:
The number of calories you need
to consume to lose 1-2 pounds
per week:
The number of calories you need
to consume to gain 1-2 pounds
per week:
How accurate are calorie calculators for weight loss?
Calorie calculators provide an estimate based on standard formulas and individual inputs. While they are generally accurate for many people, individual variations such as metabolism, muscle mass, and medical conditions can affect their accuracy. It's important to use the calculator as a starting point and adjust your calorie intake based on your progress and any feedback from a healthcare professional.

What should I do if I'm not losing weight despite following the calorie calculator recommendations?

If you're not losing weight despite following the recommendations, consider the following:

Track Your Food Intake Accurately: Ensure you're logging all your food and drink intake, as underestimating calories is common

Reevaluate Your Activity Level: You might be overestimating how active you are.

Consult a Professional: A dietitian or nutritionist can provide personalized advice.

Consider Other Factors: Stress, sleep, and hormonal imbalances can also affect weight loss.

Adjust your calorie intake and activity level as needed, and be patient with the process.

If you have a specific file or additional information you need help with, please let me know!
calorie allowance calculator

Free calorie deficit calculator

Calculating your calorie deficit is essential for losing weight because it helps you understand how many fewer calories you need to consume than your body requires for maintenance. Here's how it works:

Determine your maintenance calories: This is the number of calories you need to consume to maintain your current weight, taking into account your age, gender, weight, height, and activity level. You can use a calorie calculator for this purpose.

Set your weight loss goal: Decide how much weight you want to lose. A safe and sustainable rate is typically 1-2 pounds per week, which requires a calorie deficit of 500-1,000 calories per day.

Calculate your calorie deficit: Subtract the number of calories you plan to cut from your maintenance calories. For example, if your maintenance calories are 2,500 per day and you want to lose 1 pound per week, you would aim to consume 2,000 calories per day (a deficit of 500 calories).

Monitor and adjust: Track your food intake and physical activity to ensure you're meeting your calorie deficit goal. If you find that you're not losing weight as expected, you may need to adjust your calorie intake or increase your physical activity.

By calculating and maintaining a calorie deficit, you ensure that your body uses stored fat for energy, leading to weight loss.

Types of Calories

Calories are classified based on their source. Each macronutrient group provides the body with a certain number of calories per gram. The main types of calories are classified by the following sources:

Types of Calories by Macronutrient Source

1. Carbohydrates:
O

Caloric Content: 4 calories per gram

O

Sources: bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruits, vegetables, sweets.

O

Function: the main source of energy for the body. Carbohydrates are divided into simple (sugars) and complex (starches and fiber).

2. Proteins:
O

Caloric Content: 4 calories per gram

O

Sources: meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts.

O

Function: the primary building material for cells, essential for growth and tissue repair.

3. Fats:
O

Caloric Content: 9 calories per gram

O

Sources: oils, nuts, seeds, avocado, fatty fish, cheeses, meat.

O

Function: provide energy, support cell membrane health, aid in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K).

Other Types of Calories

1. Alcohol:
O

Caloric Content: 7 calories per gram

O

Sources: beer, wine, spirits.

O

Function: not an essential macronutrient and does not perform any vital functions for the body. Alcohol calories are often considered empty calories because they do not provide nutrients.

General Concepts about Calories

Empty Calories: These are calories that do not provide nutrients other than energy. They are often found in sweets, soft drinks, fast food, and alcoholic beverages.

Caloric Density: This is the amount of calories in a specific amount of food. Foods with high caloric density typically contain more calories in a small amount of food (e.g., nuts, oils). Foods with low caloric density, on the other hand, contain fewer calories in a larger amount of food (e.g., vegetables, fruits).

Food

Calories per 100g

Caloric Density

Nuts

500-700

High

 Avocado

160

Medium

Chicken Breast (cooked)

165

Medium

Apples

52

Low

Lettuce

15

Low

Understanding the types of calories and their sources helps you better plan your diet and achieve specific goals such as weight loss, muscle gain, or maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Each macronutrient group performs unique functions in the body, and it is important to balance their intake to ensure optimal health and well-being.
calculation of the number of calories needed per day

Daily caloric needs

To calculate how many calories you need, you can follow these steps:

1. **Determine Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR):** This is the number of calories your body needs at rest to maintain basic physiological functions like breathing and circulation. There are several formulas to calculate BMR, such as the Harris-Benedict equation. Here’s how you can calculate it:

Harris-Benedict Equation:

- For men:
     BMR = 88.362 + (13.397 \times \text{weight in kg}) + (4.799 \times \text{height in cm}) - (5.677 \times \text{age in years})

- For women:
     BMR = 447.593 + (9.247 \times \text{weight in kg}) + (3.098 \times \text{height in cm}) - (4.330 \times \text{age in years})

2. **Calculate Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE):** This is the total number of calories you need in a day, taking into account your activity level. Multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor:

Sedentary (little or no exercise): BMR Ч 1.2
Lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week): BMR Ч 1.375
Moderately active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week): BMR Ч 1.55
Very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week): BMR Ч 1.725
Super active (very hard exercise/physical job): BMR Ч 1.9

Example Calculation

Let's consider an example of a 30-year-old woman who weighs 70 kg, is 165 cm tall, and is moderately active.
1. **Calculate BMR:**

BMR = 447.593 + (9.247 \times 70) + (3.098 \times 165) - (4.330 \times 30)

BMR = 447.593 + 647.29 + 510.57 - 129.9

BMR = 1475.553

2. **Calculate TDEE:**
Let's consider an example of a 30-year-old woman who weighs 70 kg, is 165 cm tall, and is moderately active.

    TDEE = 1475.553 \times 1.55

TDEE = 2287.10815

So, this woman needs approximately 2287 calories per day to maintain her current weight.

Tables for Reference

Activity Level Multipliers

Activity Level

Multiplier

Sedentary

1.2

Lightly active

1.375

Moderately active

1.55

Very active

1.725

Super active

1.9

Example Calculation Summary

Parameter

Value

Age

30 years

Weight

70 kg

Height

165 cm

BMR

  1475.553

Activity Level

Moderately active

TDEE 

2287     

By following these steps and using the provided formulas, you can calculate the number of calories you need based on your personal details and activity level.

You can gain weight if you eat like this

This eating plan promotes weight gain, so it should be avoided!

To gain weight in a healthy manner, it's important to consume nutrient-dense foods that provide a good balance of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) along with vitamins and minerals. Here’s a detailed guide on foods to include in your diet for weight gain:

High-Calorie, Nutrient-Dense Foods

1. Proteins

Lean Meats: Chicken, turkey, lean beef, pork

Fish: Salmon, tuna, mackerel

Eggs: Whole eggs

Dairy: Milk, yogurt, cheese

Legumes: Lentils, beans, chickpeas

Protein Supplements: Whey protein, casein protein

1. Carbohydrates

Whole Grains: Brown rice, oats, quinoa, whole wheat bread

Starchy Vegetables: Potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, mangoes, dried fruits

Legumes: Beans, lentils, peas

1. Fats

Nuts and Seeds: Almonds, walnuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds

Healthy Oils: Olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil

Avocados: Whole avocados

Fatty Fish: Salmon, mackerel, sardines

Sample Meal Plan for Weight Gain

Meal        Foods Included

Breakfast        Oatmeal with milk, topped with bananas and nuts

Snack        Greek yogurt with honey and berries

Lunch        Grilled chicken breast, quinoa, and roasted vegetables

Snack        Whole grain toast with avocado and a boiled egg

Dinner        Baked salmon, sweet potatoes, and a side salad with olive oil dressing

Snack        Smoothie with protein powder, milk, spinach, peanut butter, and a banana

Example Calorie and Nutrient Breakdown

Food Item

Quantity

Calories

Protein (g)

Carbs (g)

Fats (g)

Oatmeal

1 cup

 150

 6

 27

 3

Milk

1 cup

 150

 8

 12

 8

Banana

1 medium

 105

 1

 27

 0,3

Nuts (mixed)

1/4 cup

 200

 5

 6

 18

Greek yogurt

1 cup

 100

 10

 10

 0

Honey

1 tbsp

 64

 0

 17

 0

Berries (mixed)

1 cup

 50

 1

 12

 0,5

Grilled chicken breast

6 oz

 280

 53

 0

 6

Quinoa

1 cup cooked

 222

 8

 39

 4

Roasted vegetables

1 cup

 100

 2

 20

 3

Whole grain toast

2 slices

 160

 6

 28

 2

Avocado

1/2 medium

 120

 1

 12

 10

Boiled egg

1 large

 70

 6

 1

 5

Baked salmon

6 oz

 350

 34

 0

 20

Sweet potato

1 medium

 112

 2

 26

 0,1

Side salad

1 cup

 50

 1

 10

 1

Olive oil dressing

2 tbsp

 240

 0

 0

 28

Smoothie (with ingredients)

1 large glass

 500

 30

 50

 20

Peanut butter

2 tbsp

190

8

6

16

Daily Total

Total Calories

Total Protein (g)

Total Carbs (g)

Total Fats (g)

3713

182

363

144

Diet plan to lose calories

To lose weight, it's important to focus on nutrient-dense foods that are low in calories but high in vitamins, minerals, and other essential nutrients. Here’s a list of food categories along with examples and their benefits for weight loss. Additionally, I'll include figures and tables for better visualization.

Food Categories for Weight Loss:

Vegetables

Fruits

Lean Proteins

Whole Grains

Healthy Fats

Legumes and Pulses

Dairy and Alternatives

Example Foods and Benefits

1. Vegetables
Benefits: High in fiber, low in calories, rich in vitamins and minerals.

Examples:

Leafy Greens: Spinach, kale

Cruciferous Vegetables: Broccoli, cauliflower

Root Vegetables: Carrots, beets

2. Fruits
Benefits: Provide essential vitamins, antioxidants, and fiber.

Examples:

Berries: Blueberries, strawberries

Citrus: Oranges, grapefruits

Others: Apples, pears

3. Lean Proteins
Benefits: Essential for muscle maintenance, satiety, and metabolism.

Examples:

Poultry: Chicken breast, turkey

Fish: Salmon, cod

Plant-based: Tofu, tempeh

4. Whole Grains
Benefits: High in fiber, help with satiety, and provide sustained energy.

Examples:

Oats

Quinoa

Brown rice

5. Healthy Fats
Benefits: Important for hormone production, satiety, and nutrient absorption.

Examples:

Nuts: Almonds, walnuts

Seeds: Chia seeds, flaxseeds

Oils: Olive oil, avocado oil

6. Legumes and Pulses
Benefits: High in protein and fiber, help with satiety.

Examples:

Lentils

Chickpeas

Black beans

7. Dairy and Alternatives
Benefits: Provide calcium, protein, and probiotics (in the case of yogurt).

Examples:

Low-fat yogurt

Skim milk

Plant-based milk (e.g., almond milk)

Tables for Reference

Nutrient-Dense Foods for Weight Loss

Category

Example Foods

Key Benefits

Vegetables

Spinach, Broccoli

High in fiber, vitamins, low calorie

Fruits

Blueberries, Apples

Antioxidants, vitamins, fiber

Lean Proteins

Chicken, Tofu

Muscle maintenance, satiety

Whole Grains

Oats, Quinoa

Fiber, sustained energy

Healthy Fats

Almonds, Olive Oil

Satiety, nutrient absorption

Legumes and Pulses

Lentils, Chickpeas

Protein, fiber

Dairy and Alternatives

Yogurt, Almond Milk

Calcium, probiotics

Example Daily Meal Plan for Weight Loss

Meal

Food Example

Calories

Breakfast

Greek yogurt with berries

250

Snack

Apple with almond butter

200

Lunch

Grilled chicken salad

350

Snack

Carrot sticks and hummus

150

Dinner

Baked salmon with quinoa and steamed broccoli

500

 Total


1450

the rate of food for weight loss per day

Macronutrient Distribution

Macronutrient

Percentage of Total Calories

Protein

25-30%

Carbohydrates

45-50%

Fats

20-25%

By focusing on these types of foods and maintaining a balanced diet, you can effectively support your weight loss goals while ensuring your body receives the necessary nutrients.

Calories in the most popular products

Here is a table with the calorie content of some of the most popular food products. This table includes a variety of foods from different categories to give you a comprehensive overview of common items you might encounter.

Calorie Content of Popular Foods

Food Item

Serving Size

Calories (kcal)

 Fruits



Apple

1 medium (182g)

95

Banana

1 medium (118g)

 105

Orange

1 medium (131g)

 62

Strawberries

1 cup (152g)

 49

Grapes

1 cup (151g)

104

Vegetables



Broccoli

1 cup, chopped (91g)

55

Carrot

1 medium (61g)

25

Tomato

1 medium (123g)

22

Potato (baked)

1 medium (173g)

161

Spinach

1 cup (30g)

7

Grains and Cereals



White Rice

1 cup (158g)

 205

Brown Rice

 1 cup (195g)

 216

Oatmeal

1 cup cooked (234g)

 154

Bread (whole wheat)

1 slice (28g)

 81

Bread (white)

 1 slice (28g)

 79

Proteins



Chicken Breast (cooked)

100g

 165

Beef (sirloin, cooked)

100g

 271

Salmon (cooked)

100g

 206

Eggs

1 large (50g)

 72

Tofu

100g

 76

Dairy and Alternatives



Milk (whole)

1 cup (244g)

149

Milk (skim)

1 cup (244g)

 83

Cheese (cheddar)

1 slice (28g)

 113

Yogurt (plain, low-fat)

1 cup (245g)

 154

Almond Milk (unsweetened)

1 cup (240ml)

30

Snacks and Sweets



Chocolate (dark)

1 bar (43g)

235

Cookies (chocolate chip)

1 cookie (16g)

78

Potato Chips

1 oz (28g)

152

Ice Cream (vanilla)

1 cup (132g)

273

Popcorn (air-popped)

1 cup (8g)

31

Beverages



Coffee (black)

1 cup (240ml)

2

Soda (cola)

1 can (355ml)

150

Orange Juice

1 cup (240ml)

112

Beer

1 can (355ml)

154

Wine (red)

5 oz (148ml)

125

What exercises can burn calories most effectively?

The number of calories burned during exercise depends on various factors including the type of exercise, duration, intensity, and individual characteristics like weight. Below are estimates of calories burned per hour for various exercises, based on a person weighing 155 pounds (70 kg). If you weigh more or less, the calories burned will vary proportionally.
counting calories burned during activities

Table: Calories Burned per Hour for Common Exercises (155 lbs)

Exercise

Calories Burned per Hour

Walking (3.5 mph)

298

Running (6 mph)

 744

Cycling (12-14 mph)

 596

Swimming (moderate effort)

 528

Yoga

 183

Aerobics (general)

 365

Weight Lifting (moderate)

 224

Dancing (general)

 331

Hiking

 430

Rowing (moderate)

 520

Basketball

 596

Tennis (singles)

 520

Jumping Rope

 744

Gardening

 298

Stationary Biking (moderate)

446

How a lot calorie requirements by age and height?
Calorie requirements vary by age, height, weight, gender, and activity level. Here’s a simplified guide to estimating daily calorie needs based on age, gender, and activity level. These estimates are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Estimated Caloric Requirements by Age, Gender, and Activity Level
Males

Age Group

Sedentary

Moderately Active

 Active

2-3 years

1

1,000-1,400

1,000-1,400

4-8 years

1,200-1,400

1,400-1,600

1,600-2,000

9-13 years

1,600-2,000

1,800-2,200

2,000-2,600

14-18 years

2,000-2,400

2,400-2,800

2,800-3,200

19-30 years

2,400-2,600

2,600-2,800

3

31-50 years

2,200-2,400

2,400-2,600

2,800-3,000

51+ years

2,000-2,200

2,200-2,400

2,400-2,800

Females

Age Group

Sedentary

Moderately Active

 Active

2-3 years

1

1,000-1,200

1,000-1,400

4-8 years

1,200-1,400

1,400-1,600

1,400-1,800

9-13 years

1,400-1,600

1,600-2,000

1,800-2,200

14-18 years

1,8

2

2,4

19-30 years

1,800-2,000

2,000-2,200

2,4

31-50 years

1,8

2

2,2

51+ years

1,6

1,8

2,000-2,200

Caloric Needs Adjustment by Height
Height can also influence caloric needs because taller individuals generally have a higher Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). Below is a rough guide to adjusting calorie needs based on height, using the average adult height as a reference.
Adjusting Caloric Needs Based on Height
For Males:

Shorter than average height (< 5'8"): Subtract 100 calories for every inch below average.

Taller than average height (> 5'8"): Add 100 calories for every inch above average.

For Males:

Shorter than average height (< 5'4"): Subtract 50-100 calories for every inch below average.

Taller than average height (> 5'4"): Add 50-100 calories for every inch above average.

Example Calculations

Example 1: 25-year-old Male, Moderately Active, 5'10"

Base caloric need (from table): 2,600-2,800 calories

Height adjustment: 5'10" is 2 inches above average (5'8"), so add 200 calories.

Estimated daily caloric need: 2,800-3,000 calories.

Example 2: 30-year-old Female, Sedentary, 5'2"

Base caloric need (from table): 1,800 calories

Height adjustment: 5'2" is 2 inches below average (5'4"), so subtract 100-200 calories.

Estimated daily caloric need: 1,600-1,700 calories.

Summary

Understanding your daily caloric needs involves considering your age, gender, activity level, and height. These tables and adjustments provide a starting point, but individual needs may vary. Monitoring your weight and adjusting your caloric intake as necessary can help you achieve your health and fitness goals.
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